Yes-yes-yes-no

This is not a new thought by any means, but it’s surprising how many hitters (and coaches) don’t know about the way you should approach each pitch at the plate.

Ask many hitters what they’re looking for when the pitch is delivered, and they will tell you they’re looking to see if it’s a strike. If it is, then they swing at it.

Problem is, if the pitcher has any kind of speed at all, by the time you look, recognize the pitch, make the decision, and start the swing, the pitch is often by you, or almost by you. This reactive mode doesn’t work too well, no matter what type of talent you have or hitting mechanics you’re using.

The proper way to approach each pitch is to assume it’s going to be a strike, and then hold up if it’s not. This is made easier if you use rotational mechanics, where the hips start the body turning and the hands come through last. You should plan on hitting each pitch, and then hold back if it’s not a good pitch to hit. In other words, you’re thinking yes-yes-yes-no.

Previous article Don’t Take Everything You Hear or See At Face Value